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Sony World Photography Awards

TALÁLKOZÁSOK

29 April
-
19 May
Read more

Láttam már diktatúrát 1987-1990

27 April
-
19 May
Read more

Szerelmem, a Tánc!

24 April
-
31 May
Read more

Szénképek

The material in Géza Seres' exhibition is a combination of 21st century and archaic tools. His themes are the enclosures that surround us, into which we build and tread the patterns that archaeologists of future ages can analyse as fossilised artefacts. The process itself is reminiscent of archaeological work: at one point in the process of making an anthracotype, the surface of the image covered with dust (bone charcoal, charcoal or lamp dust) must be cleaned of 'excess' material to produce a clear image.

26 April
-
07 May
Read more

Irodalmi portrék

April 09
-
May 07
Read more

ERŐ-emlék-MŰ

28 March
-
Read more

ART-friends

29 March
-
21 April
Read more

VÉGES és VÉGTELEN

29 March
-
22 Apris
Read more

Post Scriptum

01 April
-
29 May
Read more

Idő : Time

18 March
-
15 April
Read more

Fiat Lux!

25 March
-
20 April
Read more

Zűrállomás

29 March
-
25 April
Read more

Az én világom

15 March
-
04 April
Read more

Összegyűrt fény

10 March
-
10 April
Read more

Rejtőzködő kincsek: Ormánság

10 March
-
Read more

MELEGÁGY - meg némi gaz

08 March
-
22 March
Read more

EZ VAN

02 March
-
25 March
Read more

HMJ Photos 2022

02 March
-
24 March
Read more

Szabad Egyetem

-
Read more

Szubjektív objektívek

24 February
-
18 March
Read more

A cirkusz láthatatlan lelke

09 February
-
31 March
Read more

No Public Transport to Photography

04 February
-
02 April
Read more

Csendéletek?

03 February
-
18 February
Read more

Üveghangok

01 February
-
24 February
Read more

XXI. Nemzetközi - Magyar Fotószalon Közép-magyarországi régió díjazott és válogatott műveit bemutató fotókiállítás

26 January
-
26 February
Read more

Atlas

21 January
-
17 April
Read more

Színe-java

When I started to engage with photography more deeply, it was mainly in the documentary movement that I discovered realism in photography. However, I realised that reality is chaotic, the world around us is disorderly, and many noises and distractions interfere with the creation of images. Even though I try to expose at the best angle and moment, when the shutter of the camera opens, all the hidden and visible, wanted and unwanted elements of reality are captured in the image. Later, as I’m looking at the photograph, I feel that natural or physical phenomena or simply chance have created a disturbance in the image that destroys it.

Unlike photography, painting is the product of the artist's subjective ideas and thoughts. The subject matter, composition and colour of a painting are chosen by the artist to interpret their thoughts and emotions. In the studio, the painter can control the creative process more easily. On the other hand, when taking photographs, real life always leads me by the nose.

It is common in contemporary photographic practice to manipulate digitally produced photography with digital tools. The aim is to achieve a "painting-like" effect, but this is only a technology and does not lend the photograph any uniqueness.

I am a painter by training, with a degree in painting. During my artistic studies I became acquainted with aesthetic and compositional problems. I have become well versed in colour theory, spatial perception and the construction of the image. Armed with this kind of artistic vision, I began to photograph. I was mainly interested in how to make a photograph unique, what means I could use as a painter to reinterpret and highlight the subject of a photograph. Colours and colouring gave me the answer. But I didn't want to make a colour photo using a physico-chemical or digital process, but to interpret the subject of the photos by subjective colouring. So in recent years I have experimented with different forms of painting on my photographs. I have either painted directly onto the prints of the images, as photographers did a hundred years ago, or I have covered them with thick oil paint and kept only a few highlighted elements of the image. I also experimented with printing the photographs on paper and canvas. I try to speak a visual language that allows the painting techniques to blend with the photographic. Through the use of colour and highlighting, I aim to preserve the documentary value of the photograph as a subjective interpretation of reality.

In this exhibition I display my experiments, a combination of my photographic and painting work. My works are both photographs and paintings - I call these attempts photographic painting.

This exhibition is supported by the National Cultural Fund.

4 January
-
15 January
Read more

Lójárgányos öntözőművek - book presentation

15 December
-
Read more

Ég és föld találkozása az égből (drónnal) és a földről a korszerű templomépítészetben V. rész

01 December
-
08 December
Read more

Itt a vége!

25 November
-
07 December
Read more

Dialogue on the Experience of Architecture

20 November
-
28 November
Read more

Leáradó fény

23 November
-
15 December
Read more

András Bán: Péter Horváth. Szabad szemmel

25 November
-
Read more

Egy pár magasszárú


© Ilona Nyilas: Egy pár magasszárú (detail from the series), 2016, giclée print, 30 × 40 cm
21 November
-
30 November
Read more

Trup și Suflet

13 November
-
26 November
Read more

Keleti Éva 90!

12 November
-
31 December
Read more

Constante Évolution

03 November
-
18 December
Read more

La Navetteur

04 November
-
04 December
Read more

kék szemmel

06 November
-
15 January
Read more

Régi-új képek

28 October
-
3 December
Read more

Space

Completed in 2021, the photo series, Space is Balázs Deim’s latest work. The project, which connects the realms of perception, imagination and personal memories, re-evaluates everyday objects and places in such a way that they appear as evidence of space travels. At the same time, it does not hide the signs of everydayness and the original functions of the objects. This way, the images of space that are created with simple objects are re-contextualized as the documentation of a private, internal journey.

The project combines the notion of játék (playing, game, toy) with the phenomena of nostalgia and wanderlust. The images activate multiple interpretative layers of the concept ranging from toys, the act of playing and the child’s universe to the creative process of experimentation, which is highly characteristic of Balázs Deim’s works. The photos point towards the future as they probe infinity with the curiosity of a child who has become aware of the universe and the ceaseless desire to discover the unknown. They are also a nostalgic evocation of the past, whence moments and places of childhood, deeply buried in the subconscious, emerge. These include the real or imagined memory of a playground, an image from an old magazine, and a Cold War era newsreel. Some of the pictures serve as a tribute to photographers who influenced Balázs Deim’s outlook.

5 November
-
5 December
Read more

Attributed Portraits

13 October
-
12 November
Read more

Mandur László emlékkiállítás

10.15
-
10.10
Read more

The Way Things Stand

20 October
-
9 January
Read more

Interdisciplinary visions

25 October
-
6 November
Read more

Pixel world

25 October
-
6 November
Read more

Évek és képek

10.07.
-
10.30.
Read more

Posztamentum

10.12.
-
11.01.
Read more

Retinába égett emlékek 

10.07.
-
10.31.
Read more

Forgotten Feelings?

10.03.
-
11.29.
Read more

Location Scouting

09.13.
-
09.25.
Read more

Arcmások

09.17.
-
10.07.
Read more

A vörös sziklák és sivatagok földje: Ausztrália

09.25.
-
Read more

Közterek (2016–2020)

09.13.
-
10.14.
Read more

Light Therapy

With his first solo show at Mai Manó House and at an arts institution, photographer Zoltán Tombor offers a comprehensive overview of his work in recent years. It was in November 2019 that the artist moved back from New York City, where he had lived and worked since 2011. Known for twenty years as a fashion photographer, he is now featured at the exhibition, Light Therapy as an autonomous creator.

On the first floor, we present a selection from the series that was inspired by the year 2020. While creating this original material, the artist examined such feelings as isolation, confinement and uncertainty, studied the effects of lacking a vision of the future and often conflicting emotions. He cannot, nor does he wish to, offer answers or solutions to his questions: what are the things in our current lives that we can do without, and what is irreplaceable? What are the things in this new situation that have real value? The series is a quiet meditation, occasioned by the unexpected episode that was 2020, with the artist looking for himself in the upheaval.

Presented on the second floor is a selection from five years of editorial work, made mostly in New York City. This material reveals a salient connection between Tombor’s applied and original art. The images in this selection were published in prestigious magazines, like Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, Time, The New York Times Style, and The Last Magazine, with such celebrities among the models as Shirin Neshat, Alicia Keys and Francesco Clemente.

Zoltán Tombor (1973) lives and works in Budapest. A self-taught photographer, he learnt the essentials in his teens, and has been a professional since 1995. Starting his career in Hungary, in 2003 he moved to Milan, working mostly on fashion, advertising and portrait commissions. In 2011 he relocated to New York City, photographing fashion for major magazines. In 2015 he launched his own annual publication, Supernation, which features his fashion and documentarian series. He is a member of the Association of Hungarian Photographers, the Hungarian Press Association, the International Center of Photography, New York, and the Professional Photographers of America. His most recent exhibition in Hungary, Homeward, was on view at Societé Budapest in 2019.

Open to the public:
31 August 2021, 6pm. – 3 October 2021
Tuesday - Sunday 12:00 – 19:00.
Closed on Mondays and public holidays.
Curator: Zita Sárvári

08.31.
-
10.03.
Read more

EXITUS 3.1

08.03.
-
08.14.
Read more

Location Scouting

09.14.
-
09.25.
Read more

Csendéletek?

07.21.
-
08.16.
Read more

Madárének

07.16.
-
Read more

Színház-Varázs

07.14.
-
08.24.
Read more

Másként gondolkodók

07.29.
-
08.15.
Read more

Szinopszis

As it opens its joint gallery with the Studio of Young Photographers, the  Association of Hungarian Photographers (est. 1956) answers a long-felt need for an exhibition space that is dedicated to its members.

Synopsis, the gallery’s first exhibition selects works from the first decade of the Studio of Young Photographers, which the Association established in 1977 and has maintained ever since. The first-generation creators of the Studio who are featured at the display are by now multi-award-winning artists of the Association, key figures of Hungarian contemporary photography. The exhibiting artists are Sándor Apáti-Tóth, András Balla, András Bánkuti, Imre Benkő, Gábor Fejér, Péter Horváth, Antal Jokesz, Ferenc Kanyó, Gábor Kerekes, György Stalter, János Szerencsés, László Tasnádi, Péter Tímár, György Tóth, Attila Vécsy, and Magdolna Vékás.

Curators: Péter Baki and Viktória Balogh

06.28.
-
07.24.
Read more

Az én arcom

07.03.
-
08.28.
Read more

Unknown

07.09.
-
08.31.
Read more

Cirkusz a függöny mögött

07.06.
-
07.25.
Read more

Egy pokoli színjáték díszletei

07.15.
-
08.28.
Read more

Csendéletek?

06.17.
-
07.17.
Read more

Duplex, triplex

06.16.
-
06.30.
Read more

Der Plan.

06.15.
-
08.15.
Read more

Posztamentum

06.14.
-
07.08.
Read more

Emlékezet

-
Read more

POST-SOVIET - The Photos of Lenke Szilágyi 1990–2002

For more than a decade, photographer Lenke Szilágyi (who has also been working as a photo-archivist in the Archives for a number of years) has regularly traveled to the (former) Soviet Union, witnessing and documenting the fall of Communism and Post-Soviet realities not only in large centers like Moscow or St. Petersburg but also in the provinces (the Black Sea coast, the Volga region, Karelia, etc.). Her photos are sensitive imprints of an era of constant change and territory of eternal immutability. She depicts in her portraits the hopes and despairs of the time, while also adding her own witty commentaries in the diary entries accompanying the photos. This exhibition is the first major presentation of this collection.

---

Lenke Szilágyi started her career as a documentarian of the Budapest underground in the 1980s: her unique portraits of legendary literary figures, artists, actors, filmmakers, musicians, and members of the democratic opposition and her sensitive photos of the everyday life of this scene made her one of the most important photographers of the period. In the mid-1980s, she began her travels all over the world; it was in 1990 that she first travelled to Moscow, on an assignment for the samizdat journal Beszélő to cover the Helsinki Conference. But she also documented a city that was at the time still the capital of the Soviet Union, which collapsed a year later.

   A year later, she spent four months in the crumbling country in the company of a Hungarian Bulgakov-scholar and his friends. They stayed in Sukhumi on the Black Sea coast, also travelling to conferences in St. Petersburg, Samara or Kyiv. She spent the last month of this sojourn on a voyage down the Volga and on the Black Sea. The photos she took during her voyage, again, focus more on the people and their immediate surroundings than on the sea or the majestic river with its colorful autumn landscapes.

   In 1993, the Georgian-Abkhazian war prevented Szilágyi and her friends from returning to Sukhumi, so they spent one month on the Russian coast of the Black Sea, in Gelendzhik, from where they travelled to the Crimea (then part of Ukraine), to St. Petersburg, and to Lake Ladoga in Karelia. Her lyrical reports (and the diary she kept during this journey) reflect her deep understanding of country life and of the local people, whether in sunny Crimea or in cold, northern Karelia. This sensitivity emerges clearly in her portraits of smoking youngsters or resting old women, too.

Szilágyi returned in 1996 to war-torn Sukhumi (under adventurous circumstances: using a fake passport), finding burnt-down houses, and hardly any of her former friends in the once charming city. In the following years she regularly traveled to Russia: she took a trip to Lake Baykal and Irkutsk in 2001 and spent a couple of weeks on the beach at Blagoveshchenskaya on the Black Sea in 2002. Wherever she went, she took photos that, to quote art critic András Bán, are “unique, and do not tolerate captions or comments… they are meaningful in themselves as if floating... ” Their compositional wit and sometimes their sheer strangeness capture the spontaneity of street scenes

Her scenes capture the peculiarities of the post-soviet era with a great sense of composition, light, and environment, showing a remarkable ability to communicate both humor and tragedy. The exhibition brings together photographs in both black and white and color, many of which were processed and developed by the artist herself at the time.

Curator: Katalin Székely

07.17.
-
09.20.
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Exhibition by Zsolt Hamarits

07.21.
-
08.09.
Read more

Cuba - Ways

07.06.
-
07.31.
Read more

Exhibition by Wei Xiang

03.10.
-
03.30.
Read more

Kertek Berlin Neukölln

03.10.
-
04.04.
Read more

A kevesebb több - Breuer Marcell brutalizmusának minimalizmusa

03.10.
-
Read more

Erdélyi Zenészek - Körmük alatt a nóta

03.12.
-
04.09.
Read more

Madárének

03.11.
-
04.01.
Read more

Idősíkok

03.03.
-
04.04.
Read more

Atlantisz

02.29.
-
Read more

Unwanted Butterfly

03.04.
-
04.05.
Read more

Welcome

02.26.
-
04.05.
Read more

Visszapillantás (1964–2020)

02.23.
-
04.19.
Read more

Ég és föld találkozása a korszerű templomépítészetben, II. rész

02.21.
-
Read more

Concrete Questions

02.18.
-
03.12.
Read more

Volt egyszer egy öblösüveggyár

02.19.
-
03.09.
Read more

FOW /Fog of War/

02.13.
-
02.27.
Read more

Fényterápia

02.12.
-
03.16.
Read more

A Leica on the Frontline

KOLTA Galeria proudly presents a master exhibition – KONDOR Laszlo; a Leica on the Frontline (Chicago 1968 –Vietnam1969-70) the photo exhibit opens with greetings by Katko Tamas, Art Director KOLTA Galeria and a conversation with the photographer will be moderated by Ditzendy Attila, Journalist.

 Hungarian born photographer Kondor Laszlo,having lived in the United States for the latter half of the 20th century, returning to Hungary after the fall of the iron curtain - is now 78.   This photographer has spent much of his professional life documenting world events from the US Vietnam War with its inevitable anti-war violence on the streets to the political halls of Chicago‘s Mayor Richard J. Daley (1902-1976. ) Not a stranger to conflict, having survived and fled the 1956 Hungarian revolution.

 The Leica on the Frontline exhibition looks at Kondor’s response to the conflicts he witnessed. The trilogy of analog black and white images were createdin the late 1900s. The point of departure begins with a selection of work as a photojournalist in 1968 Chicago – The Whole World is Watching.  A counter-reactionis the work as a combat photographer in 1969 -1971 Vietnam – Bootson the Ground.  The finale - LifeGoes On includes images that reflect reality, lyrically with empathy and sensitivity for the Vietnamese civilians caught up in the conflict, such as the iconic image Saigon Street Orphan 1970. The exhibition’s 70 works include 20 from the permanent collection of the NVAM, National Veterans Art Museum in Chicago.

 

Megan Owoc, NVAM Collectionand Gallery Coordinator:

“Laszlo Kondor’s photographs of the Vietnam War are essential to the National Veterans Art Museum’s permanent collection. Kondor’s photos capture the inexorable horrors andanxieties of wartime, as well as the enduring moments of camaraderie, empathy,and innocence of both the American soldiers and Vietnamese civilians. These important images illustrate, first hand, the moments that defined the experience of serving in Vietnam during the war, and that continue to shape the character of our country in the years since.”

 

Kondor rarely exhibited, the day-to-day pressure of creating photographs for the press, in publications, and in printmay explain why.  The photographer was either directly commissioned by one or another magazine or client to produce their photos, or his photo-reports from the front lines of the Vietnam war were published in newspapers. However, Kondor had an instinct to horde and carefully maintained an archive of work from his 35-year career. Today, retired and living in Kapolcs, Hungary, Kondor is revisiting his archives to select images that illuminate his life in photography.  

In September 2020, this exhibit will travel to the NVAM in Chicago with a corresponding documentary film - Out of a Darkroom, the Life of Kondor Laszlo by Endre Dozsa and the publication Kondor Laszlo, as I Saw It - Vietnam Era, edited by Mate Havasi.

01.31.
-
03.06.
Read more

Időszámításom szerint

01.31.
-
03.07.
Read more

Kék szemmel

12.11.
-
01.17.
Read more

Emlékszépek

12.05.
-
Read more

LIFE/PICS

12.10.
-
02.02.
Read more

A celluloid-film 130 éve, egy fotótechnika-történész képzőművészeti reflexiói

11.21.
-
12.14.
Read more

Boldog órák szép emlékeképen

11.21.
-
01.06.
Read more

What has Remained - Of István Medgyaszay’s Buildings, After 100 Years

11.18.
-
11.30.
Read more

„az írás is Isten írása vala” 

11.05.
-
11.29.
Read more

Abstraction

10.24.
-
11.13.
Read more

Sony World Photography Awards

TALÁLKOZÁSOK

29 April
-
19 May
Read more

Láttam már diktatúrát 1987-1990

27 April
-
19 May
Read more

Szerelmem, a Tánc!

24 April
-
31 May
Read more

Szénképek

The material in Géza Seres' exhibition is a combination of 21st century and archaic tools. His themes are the enclosures that surround us, into which we build and tread the patterns that archaeologists of future ages can analyse as fossilised artefacts. The process itself is reminiscent of archaeological work: at one point in the process of making an anthracotype, the surface of the image covered with dust (bone charcoal, charcoal or lamp dust) must be cleaned of 'excess' material to produce a clear image.

26 April
-
07 May
Read more

Irodalmi portrék

April 09
-
May 07
Read more

ERŐ-emlék-MŰ

28 March
-
Read more

ART-friends

29 March
-
21 April
Read more

VÉGES és VÉGTELEN

29 March
-
22 Apris
Read more

Post Scriptum

01 April
-
29 May
Read more

Idő : Time

18 March
-
15 April
Read more

Fiat Lux!

25 March
-
20 April
Read more

Zűrállomás

29 March
-
25 April
Read more

Az én világom

15 March
-
04 April
Read more

Összegyűrt fény

10 March
-
10 April
Read more

Rejtőzködő kincsek: Ormánság

10 March
-
Read more

MELEGÁGY - meg némi gaz

08 March
-
22 March
Read more

EZ VAN

02 March
-
25 March
Read more

HMJ Photos 2022

02 March
-
24 March
Read more

Szabad Egyetem

-
Read more

Szubjektív objektívek

24 February
-
18 March
Read more

A cirkusz láthatatlan lelke

09 February
-
31 March
Read more

No Public Transport to Photography

04 February
-
02 April
Read more

Csendéletek?

03 February
-
18 February
Read more

Üveghangok

01 February
-
24 February
Read more

XXI. Nemzetközi - Magyar Fotószalon Közép-magyarországi régió díjazott és válogatott műveit bemutató fotókiállítás

26 January
-
26 February
Read more

Atlas

21 January
-
17 April
Read more

Színe-java

When I started to engage with photography more deeply, it was mainly in the documentary movement that I discovered realism in photography. However, I realised that reality is chaotic, the world around us is disorderly, and many noises and distractions interfere with the creation of images. Even though I try to expose at the best angle and moment, when the shutter of the camera opens, all the hidden and visible, wanted and unwanted elements of reality are captured in the image. Later, as I’m looking at the photograph, I feel that natural or physical phenomena or simply chance have created a disturbance in the image that destroys it.

Unlike photography, painting is the product of the artist's subjective ideas and thoughts. The subject matter, composition and colour of a painting are chosen by the artist to interpret their thoughts and emotions. In the studio, the painter can control the creative process more easily. On the other hand, when taking photographs, real life always leads me by the nose.

It is common in contemporary photographic practice to manipulate digitally produced photography with digital tools. The aim is to achieve a "painting-like" effect, but this is only a technology and does not lend the photograph any uniqueness.

I am a painter by training, with a degree in painting. During my artistic studies I became acquainted with aesthetic and compositional problems. I have become well versed in colour theory, spatial perception and the construction of the image. Armed with this kind of artistic vision, I began to photograph. I was mainly interested in how to make a photograph unique, what means I could use as a painter to reinterpret and highlight the subject of a photograph. Colours and colouring gave me the answer. But I didn't want to make a colour photo using a physico-chemical or digital process, but to interpret the subject of the photos by subjective colouring. So in recent years I have experimented with different forms of painting on my photographs. I have either painted directly onto the prints of the images, as photographers did a hundred years ago, or I have covered them with thick oil paint and kept only a few highlighted elements of the image. I also experimented with printing the photographs on paper and canvas. I try to speak a visual language that allows the painting techniques to blend with the photographic. Through the use of colour and highlighting, I aim to preserve the documentary value of the photograph as a subjective interpretation of reality.

In this exhibition I display my experiments, a combination of my photographic and painting work. My works are both photographs and paintings - I call these attempts photographic painting.

This exhibition is supported by the National Cultural Fund.

4 January
-
15 January
Read more

Lójárgányos öntözőművek - book presentation

15 December
-
Read more

Ég és föld találkozása az égből (drónnal) és a földről a korszerű templomépítészetben V. rész

01 December
-
08 December
Read more

Itt a vége!

25 November
-
07 December
Read more

Dialogue on the Experience of Architecture

20 November
-
28 November
Read more

Leáradó fény

23 November
-
15 December
Read more

András Bán: Péter Horváth. Szabad szemmel

25 November
-
Read more

Egy pár magasszárú


© Ilona Nyilas: Egy pár magasszárú (detail from the series), 2016, giclée print, 30 × 40 cm
21 November
-
30 November
Read more

Trup și Suflet

13 November
-
26 November
Read more

Keleti Éva 90!

12 November
-
31 December
Read more

Constante Évolution

03 November
-
18 December
Read more

La Navetteur

04 November
-
04 December
Read more

kék szemmel

06 November
-
15 January
Read more

Régi-új képek

28 October
-
3 December
Read more

Space

Completed in 2021, the photo series, Space is Balázs Deim’s latest work. The project, which connects the realms of perception, imagination and personal memories, re-evaluates everyday objects and places in such a way that they appear as evidence of space travels. At the same time, it does not hide the signs of everydayness and the original functions of the objects. This way, the images of space that are created with simple objects are re-contextualized as the documentation of a private, internal journey.

The project combines the notion of játék (playing, game, toy) with the phenomena of nostalgia and wanderlust. The images activate multiple interpretative layers of the concept ranging from toys, the act of playing and the child’s universe to the creative process of experimentation, which is highly characteristic of Balázs Deim’s works. The photos point towards the future as they probe infinity with the curiosity of a child who has become aware of the universe and the ceaseless desire to discover the unknown. They are also a nostalgic evocation of the past, whence moments and places of childhood, deeply buried in the subconscious, emerge. These include the real or imagined memory of a playground, an image from an old magazine, and a Cold War era newsreel. Some of the pictures serve as a tribute to photographers who influenced Balázs Deim’s outlook.

5 November
-
5 December
Read more

Attributed Portraits

13 October
-
12 November
Read more

Mandur László emlékkiállítás

10.15
-
10.10
Read more

The Way Things Stand

20 October
-
9 January
Read more

Interdisciplinary visions

25 October
-
6 November
Read more

Pixel world

25 October
-
6 November
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Évek és képek

10.07.
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10.30.
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Posztamentum

10.12.
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11.01.
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Retinába égett emlékek 

10.07.
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10.31.
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Forgotten Feelings?

10.03.
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11.29.
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Location Scouting

09.13.
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09.25.
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Arcmások

09.17.
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10.07.
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A vörös sziklák és sivatagok földje: Ausztrália

09.25.
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Közterek (2016–2020)

09.13.
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10.14.
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Light Therapy

With his first solo show at Mai Manó House and at an arts institution, photographer Zoltán Tombor offers a comprehensive overview of his work in recent years. It was in November 2019 that the artist moved back from New York City, where he had lived and worked since 2011. Known for twenty years as a fashion photographer, he is now featured at the exhibition, Light Therapy as an autonomous creator.

On the first floor, we present a selection from the series that was inspired by the year 2020. While creating this original material, the artist examined such feelings as isolation, confinement and uncertainty, studied the effects of lacking a vision of the future and often conflicting emotions. He cannot, nor does he wish to, offer answers or solutions to his questions: what are the things in our current lives that we can do without, and what is irreplaceable? What are the things in this new situation that have real value? The series is a quiet meditation, occasioned by the unexpected episode that was 2020, with the artist looking for himself in the upheaval.

Presented on the second floor is a selection from five years of editorial work, made mostly in New York City. This material reveals a salient connection between Tombor’s applied and original art. The images in this selection were published in prestigious magazines, like Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, Time, The New York Times Style, and The Last Magazine, with such celebrities among the models as Shirin Neshat, Alicia Keys and Francesco Clemente.

Zoltán Tombor (1973) lives and works in Budapest. A self-taught photographer, he learnt the essentials in his teens, and has been a professional since 1995. Starting his career in Hungary, in 2003 he moved to Milan, working mostly on fashion, advertising and portrait commissions. In 2011 he relocated to New York City, photographing fashion for major magazines. In 2015 he launched his own annual publication, Supernation, which features his fashion and documentarian series. He is a member of the Association of Hungarian Photographers, the Hungarian Press Association, the International Center of Photography, New York, and the Professional Photographers of America. His most recent exhibition in Hungary, Homeward, was on view at Societé Budapest in 2019.

Open to the public:
31 August 2021, 6pm. – 3 October 2021
Tuesday - Sunday 12:00 – 19:00.
Closed on Mondays and public holidays.
Curator: Zita Sárvári

08.31.
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10.03.
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EXITUS 3.1

08.03.
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08.14.
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Location Scouting

09.14.
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09.25.
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Csendéletek?

07.21.
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08.16.
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Madárének

07.16.
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Színház-Varázs

07.14.
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08.24.
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Másként gondolkodók

07.29.
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08.15.
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Szinopszis

As it opens its joint gallery with the Studio of Young Photographers, the  Association of Hungarian Photographers (est. 1956) answers a long-felt need for an exhibition space that is dedicated to its members.

Synopsis, the gallery’s first exhibition selects works from the first decade of the Studio of Young Photographers, which the Association established in 1977 and has maintained ever since. The first-generation creators of the Studio who are featured at the display are by now multi-award-winning artists of the Association, key figures of Hungarian contemporary photography. The exhibiting artists are Sándor Apáti-Tóth, András Balla, András Bánkuti, Imre Benkő, Gábor Fejér, Péter Horváth, Antal Jokesz, Ferenc Kanyó, Gábor Kerekes, György Stalter, János Szerencsés, László Tasnádi, Péter Tímár, György Tóth, Attila Vécsy, and Magdolna Vékás.

Curators: Péter Baki and Viktória Balogh

06.28.
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07.24.
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Az én arcom

07.03.
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08.28.
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Unknown

07.09.
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08.31.
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Cirkusz a függöny mögött

07.06.
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07.25.
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Egy pokoli színjáték díszletei

07.15.
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08.28.
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Csendéletek?

06.17.
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07.17.
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Duplex, triplex

06.16.
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06.30.
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Der Plan.

06.15.
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08.15.
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Posztamentum

06.14.
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07.08.
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Emlékezet

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POST-SOVIET - The Photos of Lenke Szilágyi 1990–2002

For more than a decade, photographer Lenke Szilágyi (who has also been working as a photo-archivist in the Archives for a number of years) has regularly traveled to the (former) Soviet Union, witnessing and documenting the fall of Communism and Post-Soviet realities not only in large centers like Moscow or St. Petersburg but also in the provinces (the Black Sea coast, the Volga region, Karelia, etc.). Her photos are sensitive imprints of an era of constant change and territory of eternal immutability. She depicts in her portraits the hopes and despairs of the time, while also adding her own witty commentaries in the diary entries accompanying the photos. This exhibition is the first major presentation of this collection.

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Lenke Szilágyi started her career as a documentarian of the Budapest underground in the 1980s: her unique portraits of legendary literary figures, artists, actors, filmmakers, musicians, and members of the democratic opposition and her sensitive photos of the everyday life of this scene made her one of the most important photographers of the period. In the mid-1980s, she began her travels all over the world; it was in 1990 that she first travelled to Moscow, on an assignment for the samizdat journal Beszélő to cover the Helsinki Conference. But she also documented a city that was at the time still the capital of the Soviet Union, which collapsed a year later.

   A year later, she spent four months in the crumbling country in the company of a Hungarian Bulgakov-scholar and his friends. They stayed in Sukhumi on the Black Sea coast, also travelling to conferences in St. Petersburg, Samara or Kyiv. She spent the last month of this sojourn on a voyage down the Volga and on the Black Sea. The photos she took during her voyage, again, focus more on the people and their immediate surroundings than on the sea or the majestic river with its colorful autumn landscapes.

   In 1993, the Georgian-Abkhazian war prevented Szilágyi and her friends from returning to Sukhumi, so they spent one month on the Russian coast of the Black Sea, in Gelendzhik, from where they travelled to the Crimea (then part of Ukraine), to St. Petersburg, and to Lake Ladoga in Karelia. Her lyrical reports (and the diary she kept during this journey) reflect her deep understanding of country life and of the local people, whether in sunny Crimea or in cold, northern Karelia. This sensitivity emerges clearly in her portraits of smoking youngsters or resting old women, too.

Szilágyi returned in 1996 to war-torn Sukhumi (under adventurous circumstances: using a fake passport), finding burnt-down houses, and hardly any of her former friends in the once charming city. In the following years she regularly traveled to Russia: she took a trip to Lake Baykal and Irkutsk in 2001 and spent a couple of weeks on the beach at Blagoveshchenskaya on the Black Sea in 2002. Wherever she went, she took photos that, to quote art critic András Bán, are “unique, and do not tolerate captions or comments… they are meaningful in themselves as if floating... ” Their compositional wit and sometimes their sheer strangeness capture the spontaneity of street scenes

Her scenes capture the peculiarities of the post-soviet era with a great sense of composition, light, and environment, showing a remarkable ability to communicate both humor and tragedy. The exhibition brings together photographs in both black and white and color, many of which were processed and developed by the artist herself at the time.

Curator: Katalin Székely

07.17.
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09.20.
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Exhibition by Zsolt Hamarits

07.21.
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08.09.
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Cuba - Ways

07.06.
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07.31.
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Exhibition by Wei Xiang

03.10.
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03.30.
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Kertek Berlin Neukölln

03.10.
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04.04.
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A kevesebb több - Breuer Marcell brutalizmusának minimalizmusa

03.10.
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Erdélyi Zenészek - Körmük alatt a nóta

03.12.
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04.09.
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Madárének

03.11.
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04.01.
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Idősíkok

03.03.
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04.04.
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Atlantisz

02.29.
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Unwanted Butterfly

03.04.
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04.05.
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Welcome

02.26.
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04.05.
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Visszapillantás (1964–2020)

02.23.
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04.19.
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Ég és föld találkozása a korszerű templomépítészetben, II. rész

02.21.
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Concrete Questions

02.18.
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03.12.
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Volt egyszer egy öblösüveggyár

02.19.
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03.09.
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FOW /Fog of War/

02.13.
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02.27.
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Fényterápia

02.12.
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03.16.
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A Leica on the Frontline

KOLTA Galeria proudly presents a master exhibition – KONDOR Laszlo; a Leica on the Frontline (Chicago 1968 –Vietnam1969-70) the photo exhibit opens with greetings by Katko Tamas, Art Director KOLTA Galeria and a conversation with the photographer will be moderated by Ditzendy Attila, Journalist.

 Hungarian born photographer Kondor Laszlo,having lived in the United States for the latter half of the 20th century, returning to Hungary after the fall of the iron curtain - is now 78.   This photographer has spent much of his professional life documenting world events from the US Vietnam War with its inevitable anti-war violence on the streets to the political halls of Chicago‘s Mayor Richard J. Daley (1902-1976. ) Not a stranger to conflict, having survived and fled the 1956 Hungarian revolution.

 The Leica on the Frontline exhibition looks at Kondor’s response to the conflicts he witnessed. The trilogy of analog black and white images were createdin the late 1900s. The point of departure begins with a selection of work as a photojournalist in 1968 Chicago – The Whole World is Watching.  A counter-reactionis the work as a combat photographer in 1969 -1971 Vietnam – Bootson the Ground.  The finale - LifeGoes On includes images that reflect reality, lyrically with empathy and sensitivity for the Vietnamese civilians caught up in the conflict, such as the iconic image Saigon Street Orphan 1970. The exhibition’s 70 works include 20 from the permanent collection of the NVAM, National Veterans Art Museum in Chicago.

 

Megan Owoc, NVAM Collectionand Gallery Coordinator:

“Laszlo Kondor’s photographs of the Vietnam War are essential to the National Veterans Art Museum’s permanent collection. Kondor’s photos capture the inexorable horrors andanxieties of wartime, as well as the enduring moments of camaraderie, empathy,and innocence of both the American soldiers and Vietnamese civilians. These important images illustrate, first hand, the moments that defined the experience of serving in Vietnam during the war, and that continue to shape the character of our country in the years since.”

 

Kondor rarely exhibited, the day-to-day pressure of creating photographs for the press, in publications, and in printmay explain why.  The photographer was either directly commissioned by one or another magazine or client to produce their photos, or his photo-reports from the front lines of the Vietnam war were published in newspapers. However, Kondor had an instinct to horde and carefully maintained an archive of work from his 35-year career. Today, retired and living in Kapolcs, Hungary, Kondor is revisiting his archives to select images that illuminate his life in photography.  

In September 2020, this exhibit will travel to the NVAM in Chicago with a corresponding documentary film - Out of a Darkroom, the Life of Kondor Laszlo by Endre Dozsa and the publication Kondor Laszlo, as I Saw It - Vietnam Era, edited by Mate Havasi.

01.31.
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03.06.
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Időszámításom szerint

01.31.
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03.07.
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Kék szemmel

12.11.
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01.17.
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Emlékszépek

12.05.
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LIFE/PICS

12.10.
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02.02.
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A celluloid-film 130 éve, egy fotótechnika-történész képzőművészeti reflexiói

11.21.
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12.14.
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Boldog órák szép emlékeképen

11.21.
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01.06.
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What has Remained - Of István Medgyaszay’s Buildings, After 100 Years

11.18.
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11.30.
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„az írás is Isten írása vala” 

11.05.
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11.29.
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Abstraction

10.24.
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11.13.
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